The development blog for my Honours project. Here you will find sources to research I have done, as well as the steps taken to achieve my final goal.
~ Friday, February 24 ~
Permalink
Weapon set design: organic weapons
Since so far I have only spoke of expanding into discussing firearms, as well, I decided to change the situation. The “organic” theme came about as I observed so many melee weapons designed after (or containing) organic elements: spikes and claws, which, for animals serve other functions than on weapons. However, they do make for compelling designs, and so the Crustacea set took form. A few notes on each of the weapons:
Karkinos:
This was the first design and less thought has been put into it than into the others (at first). The mobile claw serves as a storage device for the energy sphere. When it hinges upwards, the energy is released in the form of a beam. Additionally, the entire “claw” may be fired as a grappling hook, using the attached winch. Not only can the Karkinos be used as a climbing device in this way, but it may also be used to tear down light cover (such as metal containers, ungrounded concrete blocks, etc.)
Alpheus:
Based on the pistol shrimp’s claw, the Alpheus has a relatively simple firing mechanism. The lower claw (designated as the hammer) hinges upwards into the body of the gun. Pistol shrimp use this system to create an immensely powerful blast of air, which stuns prey several times larger than themselves. However, this only works under water. The Alpheus solves this issue by adding a secondary firing mechanism: as the hammer rises, a jet of fluid (different fluids may be used to achieve various effects) is pushed into the upper chamber, and then propelled through the primary firing mechanism. A fuel-filled hammer will result in a short-burst flamethrower effect, for example, while a thick gel will be more effective at knocking opponents prone and immobilizing them.
Thermidon:
Based on lobsters, the Thermidon uses a complex array of thermal devices and storage systems. It consists of two firing modes. If the “cilia” on the inside of the claw face backwards, the gun absorbs all heat emissions in a straight line, effectively acting as a freeze ray. The heat is stored in the sphere at the back of the claw. When the storage sphere becomes overheated, the user may reverse the direction of the cilia and release the stored heat with the Thermidon’s secondary firing mode. This firing mode has a shorter range, but a wider arc of fire. Because of the complex devices within the Thermidon, it is used with both hands safely away from the firing systems, with an additional clip over the shoulder (the segmented design of the shoulder clip allows it to be easily adjusted to various body types) for added support.

Weapon set design: organic weapons

Since so far I have only spoke of expanding into discussing firearms, as well, I decided to change the situation. The “organic” theme came about as I observed so many melee weapons designed after (or containing) organic elements: spikes and claws, which, for animals serve other functions than on weapons. However, they do make for compelling designs, and so the Crustacea set took form. A few notes on each of the weapons:

Karkinos:

This was the first design and less thought has been put into it than into the others (at first). The mobile claw serves as a storage device for the energy sphere. When it hinges upwards, the energy is released in the form of a beam. Additionally, the entire “claw” may be fired as a grappling hook, using the attached winch. Not only can the Karkinos be used as a climbing device in this way, but it may also be used to tear down light cover (such as metal containers, ungrounded concrete blocks, etc.)

Alpheus:

Based on the pistol shrimp’s claw, the Alpheus has a relatively simple firing mechanism. The lower claw (designated as the hammer) hinges upwards into the body of the gun. Pistol shrimp use this system to create an immensely powerful blast of air, which stuns prey several times larger than themselves. However, this only works under water. The Alpheus solves this issue by adding a secondary firing mechanism: as the hammer rises, a jet of fluid (different fluids may be used to achieve various effects) is pushed into the upper chamber, and then propelled through the primary firing mechanism. A fuel-filled hammer will result in a short-burst flamethrower effect, for example, while a thick gel will be more effective at knocking opponents prone and immobilizing them.

Thermidon:

Based on lobsters, the Thermidon uses a complex array of thermal devices and storage systems. It consists of two firing modes. If the “cilia” on the inside of the claw face backwards, the gun absorbs all heat emissions in a straight line, effectively acting as a freeze ray. The heat is stored in the sphere at the back of the claw. When the storage sphere becomes overheated, the user may reverse the direction of the cilia and release the stored heat with the Thermidon’s secondary firing mode. This firing mode has a shorter range, but a wider arc of fire. Because of the complex devices within the Thermidon, it is used with both hands safely away from the firing systems, with an additional clip over the shoulder (the segmented design of the shoulder clip allows it to be easily adjusted to various body types) for added support.

Tags: weapon design sci-fi organic guns honours project mihai georgescu allbrotnar
6 notes
  1. off-the-books reblogged this from allbrotnar and added:
    Work from last year. I wish I had the skills/balls to make a game out of these.
  2. allbrotnar reblogged this from off-the-books
  3. allbrotnarshonours posted this